Carl Rosa Company
Productions 
HMS Pinafore
 - Reviews
The Pirates of Penzance
 - Reviews
The Yeomen of the Guard
 - Reviews
The Mikado
 - Reviews
Iolanthe
 - Reviews
Patience
 - Reviews
 - Normansfield
The Merry Widow
 - Reviews
The Gondoliers
 - Reviews
Die Fledermaus
 - Reviews
  Iolanthe
 
The Guardian
Gielgud Theatre, London's West End 
by Michael Billington
15th February 2008

“Maria Ewing's Fairy Queen is, admittedly, a sinuous vamp with a voice dipped in honey. But Steven Page's Lord Chancellor, for all his susceptibility to young girls, is a figure of unusual gravity who delivers the nightmare song with skill…a highly pleasurable show, briskly conducted by Richard Balcombe, that allows the audience to savour the sexual confusion that underlay those famous Victorian values.”

The Independent
Gielgud Theatre, London's West End 
by Edward Seckerson
14th February 2008

“Gilbert and Sullivan knew their audience and so does director and designer Peter Mulloy. It's that delicate balance between charm and satire.

Bruce Graham and Barry Clark are a stalwart double act as the two Earls, Mountararat and Tolloller, and Steven Page as the Lord Chancellor gives vent to his torment at forever ‘giving agreeable girls away’ in Gilbert's very brilliant ‘Nightmare Song’.”

The Metro
Gielgud Theatre, London's West End 
by Warwick Thompson
14th February 2008

“Maria Ewing who has graced the world’s most prestigious lyric stages, is the Fairy Queen, and she turns in a performance of real vocal and theatrical weight. While she keeps within the necessarily heightened G&S style – her boomy, low contralto speaking voice is a treat itself – she doesn’t play the role for laughs and, naturally, that makes it all the funnier.”

The Times
Gielgud Theatre, London's West End 
by Hilary Finch
13th February 2008

“The set for this production by the Carl Rosa Opera Company is a properly enchanting children's pop-up book vision of an Arcadian fairyland: receding cut-out frames of leafy vistas and, later, a misty moonlit Palace of Westminster.

The Lord Chancellor is Steven Page, the embodiment of the letter and spirit of G&S law: every focused baritonic note in place, every tongue-twisted word carried, and those twitches of torment in the cheekbones.”

Country Life
Gielgud Theatre, London's West End 
by Jane Watkins
13th February 2008

“Peter Mulloy's design for the production was certainly charming, with an Art Deco inspired fairyland, and indeed, its inhabitants were equally appealing (in another era, they would certainly have attracted stage-door admirers from the ranks they were making fun of).

Of the principals, Steven Page's Lord Chancellor was exemplary, with every delicious syllable clearly audible. Maria Ewing was clearly having a ball as a diva of a Fairy Queen, conjured in equal part from Edith Evans and Anna Wintour. Bruce Graham and Barry Clark brought the Earl of Mountararat and Earl Tolloller to life and Charlotte Page was a sparky Phyllis.”

Eastern Daily Press
Evergreen charm of fairies v lords game 
by Trevor Burton
19th September 2000

“The magic of Iolanthe remains as fresh as a dewdrop in a daisy in this delightful production by the Carl Rosa Opera Company”